Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘McLoughlin Bros.’

Petrina Case - than you card

Petrina won a set of The Prize Magazine.

She was then extraordinarily kind and sent me (by real life post !) a beautiful handmade card , and also some business cards for me.

They are all on lovely paper and I been trying, and failing, to do them justice in a photograph ever since.

The gold bands were on the inside of the envelope flap. It was a wonderful surprise to see a sudden golden gleam when I opened it.

I am going to save the envelope for making something special – I don’t know exactly what yet, but it will be something that needs beautiful gold paper.

I am keeping my fingers crossed that Petrina is picked as a Graphic45 Design Team Member for 2013.

***   ***   ***   ***

I would also like to thank Paula for making such a wonderful job of the folding dolls’ house and taking the trouble to photograph it so nicely for her blog.

I was truly delighted to see it in a real-life room. The little girls look as though they are enjoying themselves, don’t they !

Thank you as well to Krin, who took this wonderful photograph of the Circus Procession book.

Krin has two blogs (I struggle with one !!!) and in the blog devoted to 24th scale she has made a beautifully neat version of the folding dolls’ house, in 1/2 scale.

This is Krin’s idea and I have not tried to make the house at this size – I am firmly stuck in 12th scale ( or larger).

Krin has very kindly given details of the paper she used…

…so, in case there is anyone who would like to make a very small folding dolls’ house, and who would struggle adapting / converting / printing out and then scanning the 12th scale pdf…

… here are a couple of pdfs for 24th scale –

McLoughlin_Folding_Doll_House_24th_scale_OHM_130326

the coloured patches for the back of the floors

McLoughlin_Folding_Doll_House_24th_scale_OHM_130326-a

The instructions for making the 12th scale folding house are in the slideshow at the bottom of the post here

I hope you have fun – and I would be pleased to hear how you get on.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Open House Minaitures - How to make an accordian fold book - Mcloughlin Circus Procession

It’s a very long time since I made any of these books and I was rather surprised when someone asked if I would demonstrate how they are made.

First many thanks are due to Q, who lent me the original book and gave me permission to use it here.

Secondly, many, many, many thanks are due to Sharon who, several blog posts ago, mentioned that she thought that HP plotter paper gave her a better print.

To cut a long story short, thanks to Sharon, I bought a large roll of 80gsm (21lbs) HP plotter paper from Amazon.

When I tried it out on my printer at home I was astonished by the results.

It is very difficult to show the quality of the print in a photograph, but I am going to try.

The top strip is 80 gsm plotter paper and the bottom strip is 100 gsm best quality inkjet (un-coated) paper.

Open House Miniatures - HP plotter paper, home print and professional print

The top strip (which is 12th scale and smaller in size) was printed last week on my home computer. My printer has an unreliable paper feed and does not reproduce colours particularly well.

The folded strip below (which is slightly larger than 12th scale) is a professionally produced giclée print from about 10 years ago. (Giclée = fancy word for ink-jet print done by a very, very good, exceedingly expensive printer – in this case an Epson.)

Sharon, I can’t thank you enough.

I have tried and, so far, failed to photograph the difference this is going to make. I can only say that a 600 ppi, professional print on this paper looks as though it is on coated ink-jet paper. It is that good.

***   ***   ***   ***

The book in the slideshow below was made using HP plotter paper but it should be possible to get a reasonable print on ordinary photocopy paper.

NOTE – the glue makes a difference as well as the printer, ink and paper on this project.

I used Evo-stick white wood working glue – this has a thick consistency and dries quickly.

The text in my 12th scale version (even on plotter paper !) are only readable to dolls’ house residents so,  please visit Project Gutenberg, where the book is reproduced in full, if you would like to read it.

I feel I ought to also mention that Paper Minis have a kit for this book (it is a long way down the page, so keep scrolling). This has a cover and readable text. There is also a tutorial on how to make it here .

I haven’t seen Paper Mini’s kits in real life and so I haven’t tried any out. They do have an enviable collection !

Finally, my version…

The McLoughlin Book that I copied was a simple accordion fold, or concertina fold, book.

In the slideshow I do not follow the usual instructions for making this type of book. (I was reproducing a book, not making one from scratch). There are some good videos on YouTube, if you want to see how one is usually made.

As the full strip of pages is 12 inches (30 cm) long, I have made two pdfs, so that there is a choice –

Print and join two strips – McLoughlin_Circus_Procession_A4_paper_20130322

Print one (very long) strip – McLoughlin_Circus_Procession_12_inch_strip_20130322

The pdf for the covers is here – McLoughlin_Circus_Procession_covers_20130322

NOTE – 23rd march 2013 –  from the comments there seems to be some confusion as to what “tissue paper” is.

In UK English, “tissue paper” is not a paper handkerchief (or “a tissue”), it is the sort of very fine paper that is sometimes used for wrapping small items before putting them in a gift box.

Have a look here on Amazon to see what I am talking about.

To escape from the slideshow at any time, press the Esc key on your keyboard.

 

Finally

The plotter paper is available from Amazon in A4 sheets too.

These would be much easier to store than the roll that I bought.

open_house_miniatures_hp_plotter_paper.

There is a page for those who like to Make and Do here and I am going to repeat here what I have said there –

  • If you want to save the pdf(s) to your computer / a CD / data stick etc. you may do that too.
  • You may use the contents of the pdf for yourself – and if you would like to make 10 of something and try selling them please go ahead, but do think first of all the other people who will be doing exactly the same thing.
  • You may share these projects with your friends and family, and miniature club.
  • You may link to them from your website / blog / satellite station, if you have one
  • You may customise them.
  • You may use them / the design ideas, in whole, or in part, as for inspiration for making your own things.

You may not copy the pdfs, or the contents of the pdfs, in whole, or in part, and re-sell them.

Read Full Post »

I have not had a computer this week and, shortly after I have uploaded this, I will not have a computer / internet connection until Wednesday, 6th March. Everyone who has been leaving me comments and messages –

Thank You ! I will try to reply as soon as possible.

Open House Miniatures How toMake a McLoughlin Folding Doll House

I usually use a professional print service.
This example was printed on my home printer.

Some time ago, I blogged about my version of the McLoughlin Folding Doll House, and I feel I should repeat here some of what I said then –

  • I do not have, and have never had, a complete example of the Folding Doll House, and I have only ever handled rather worn and battered examples. For this reason, my miniature version also looks slightly faded and worn.
  • I was born and live, and work, in the UK.
  • McLoughlin toys are comparatively unknown here and so, rather than seeing them as iconic cultural items, my interest in them veers towards the technical expertise involved in their manufacture.

This being so, a large part of me wants to write at length about lithographic printing processes and modular manufacturing as applied by mid to late 19th Century toy makers, particularly large companies like The McLoughlin Brothers.

However, I suspect that no-one, except me, is even remotely interested in this and so I will keep this short –

The McLoughlin Folding Doll House is one of the things that makes me wish that time travel was possible.

At school, we were taught that Henry Ford invented the production line – my guess is that The McLoughlin Brothers beat him to it by a number of years.

Finally, just a few more things before I leave you to grab the pdfs and start having fun –

  • If you make up this house, please be aware that the weight and type of paper that you use will make a huge difference to the result.
  • The printer and the ink will make a big difference too.

The walls and floors are here

McLoughlin_Folding_Doll_House_OHM_130301

Papers for finishing the backs of the floors (one spare) are here

McLoughlin_Folding_Doll_House_OHM_130301-a

A walkthrough for making the house is in the slideshow below.

To escape from the slideshow at any time, press the Esc button on your computer keyboard.

This is a page for those who like to Make and Do.

I am going to repeat here what I say there

  • If you want to save the pdfs to your computer / a CD / data stick etc. you may do that.
  • You may use the contents of the pdf for yourself – and if you would like to make 10 of something and try selling them please go ahead, but do think first of all the other people who will be doing exactly the same thing.
  • You may share these projects with your friends and family, and miniature club.
  • You may link to them from your website / blog / satellite station, if you have one
  • You may customise them.
  • You may use them / the design ideas, in whole, or in part, as for inspiration for making your own things.

You may not copy the pdf, or the contents of the pdf, in whole, or in part, and resell them.

A 24th scale version of this house (I have not yet tried this out !) is at the bottom of this post

Read Full Post »

About 20 years ago I saw, framed in an antique shop in Devon, a set of what I thought were wooden tiles. They made up the brightly coloured picture of Barnum’s Museum, which is one of the puzzles in this miniature set.

Open House Miniatures - doll house McLoughlin picture puzzle blocks

As someone who grew up with picture blocks that were cubes, I wondered if they had been cut down, so that they were shallow enough to be framed. And I have to admit that I was slightly disbelieving when I was told that they were American, and that not all picture blocks were the shape I thought they should be.

The single set of blocks was priced at £45 (twenty years ago!) and they remain one of the things that I very much regret that I did not didn’t buy, when I had the chance.

There are three puzzles in my miniature version of the set and they come in a stout, custom-made cardboard box.

I still wonder which gentleman’s hat is going to be the first victim of the inquisitive elephant’s trunk

 

SIZE

Each of the three puzzles is 1 inch wide x 1 and 3/16th inches high (approx 2.5cm x 3cm)

The box is just big enough to hold them, so it is a little bit larger than this.

 

HISTORY

In the late 1880s, the McLoughlin Brothers Company had the largest colour lithography printing plant in the US. They produced huge quantities of all sorts of games, toys and books – usually of the most beautiful quality.

The illustrations that I have used for this set come from the Unequalled A B C and Building Blocks.

They differ from the originals in two respects –

One side of the original blocks was illustrated, and the reverse had letters of the alphabet.

In my version the backs of the blocks are plain.

The original blocks were divided in to 12 small squares with two larger triangles at the top.

In my version the 12 small squares have become 6, slightly larger, oblongs. This is in response to the frustration expressed by those who find the smaller sized square blocks “too fiddly” – in addition it is easier to see the picture with larger blocks.

It is, however, perfectly possible to cut the blocks in to their original 12 small squares – should this be needed.

 

PLEASE NOTE

These miniature set of puzzles contains very small pieces. It is not a “toy” – it is a “collector’s item”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: