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Archive for the ‘Printables’ Category

Kits? (Why not?)

dolls' house cardboard boxes - open house miniatures 2017

“Oooohhh,” said my neighbour, who had come round to see if I was having a power-cut too (I was, but I hadn’t noticed because I wasn’t using anything electrical.) “Oooohhhh, I like that one.”

And she picked out a pretty, but highly improbable box. (Sorry to be a realist-wet-blanket. Cardboard boxes that are designed for transporting packets of soap are not intended for display and they don’t have multi-coloured printing.)

dolls' house cardboard boxes - savon au parfum

And that is when this blog post stopped being about my new camera and the search for a new supplier of card and started being about miniature cardboard boxes.

dolls' house cardboard boxes lofthaus, suchard and worth et cie

“Are you going to make kits?” my neighbour went on. She was being hopeful (again). She likes kits. She is good at putting them together and she gets very good results because she adds a touch of glamour to whatever she makes and it looks quite impossibly romantic by the time she has finished. I have asked her to let me photograph her dolls’ house, but she is shy about showing it to people and would rather it wasn’t on display here.

Anyway,  I explained about die-cutting to my neighbour and how expensive it would be to get a basic miniature box made into the sort of kit that she was thinking about and then I saw that she was looking baffled and realised that I was saying earnestly : “Basically, it’s like making a cake: if you don’t use chocolate in a chocolate cake recipe, you won’t get a chocolate cake.”

And so I stopped trying to explain and asked my neighbour if she would like to have the box and she said yes, and she told me that she is going to fold the upper flaps down inside and make it into a container for two potted geraniums.

I would never have thought of doing this and it saved the pretty, but improbable, box from going in the recycling bin, which was its original destiny.

***   ***  ***

Thinking about it later I realised that, instead of talking about cake, I should have said that the thing about real-life cardboard boxes is that they are designed by professional box makers and made by machines.

And

  • The market for miniature boxes is relatively small
  • The cost of setting up production of a miniature die-cut box is relatively high
  • The type of materials used would have to be very carefully chosen
  • None of the above makes for a cheap, or even reasonably priced, end product

Result: No 12th scale die-cut box kits as far as I know. (It would be nice if I was wrong about this).

Oh do get on with it! I imagine you are shrieking by now. Are we going to get something to download and make, or aren’t we?

Yes, there are three boxes : two sensible ones and the pretty (but improbable) one.  None of the boxes has ever existed in full-size in the ‘real’ world and Lofthaus Storage is completely my own invention.

dolls' house cardboard boxes -vintage suchard and lofthaus storage

PDFS

Lofthaus Storage
size 1.5″ x 1″ x 1.5″  –  3.75 x 2.5 x  3.75 cm (approx)

Savon au Parfum (pretty, but improbable)
size 1″ x 1/2 ” x 1/2″  –  2.5 x 1.25 x 1.25 cm (approx)

Vintage Suchard Chocolate
size 1″ x 1″ x 1/2″  –  2.5 x 2 5 x 1.25 cm (approx)

I have to say at this point that, before printing these out, I would like you continue reading about the card that I used and how I put the boxes together and why I have no plans to sell downloads of boxes.

There is also a poll at the bottom of this blog in case there is a box in the photos that you would like to make that isn’t in one of the pdfs, but before everything else I am going to make a promise: No Jargon.

There is a short article about cardboard boxes on Wikipedia. If you read it you will probably understand why I am only going to use the words ‘card’ and ‘paper’ here.

THE CARD

The brown boxes are made from 280 gsm Kraft card. I bought mine from Amazon where it is available in A4 and A5 sheets.

The two sides are slightly different in colour and texture. It is tough, nicely made, folds well and is useful for all sorts of things. It even smells of cardboard box.

With this weight of card I would struggle to make a tiny box, but it does work very well down to about ½ inch square size box (of this type).  (1.25 cm square).
Other weights are available.

NB you do need to score this firmly in order to get the card to fold.

The white boxes are made from 200 gsm Daler Rowney Heavyweight ‘paper’. This is available on Amazon, as an A4 pad.

I liked using this. It has a slightly textured, but smooth surface, cuts easily, folds nicely and takes printing ink very well. I think there must be quite a fair amount of size in it as the water based glue tends to sit on the surface.

If it has one flaw it is that it does pick up dirty marks easily.

The surface of both of these cards / papers remained unbroken when I scored and folded it once or twice. If you continue to manipulate the fold in the card / paper, without treating it with something like a plastic based glue,  it will break down.

WHAT I DID:

I used:

  • My ancient inkjet printer
  • 2 different sorts of card (as above)
  • a blunt kitchen knife for scoring the fold lines
  • a very sharp knife
  • a ruler
  • water-based glue
  • A flat surface and a non-slip cutting mat – some things I have to use a cutting mat for and this is one of them
  • ceramic baking bead – optional

What I did (For the brown Kraft card, I printed the box on the slightly darker, slightly shinier side of the card)

I let the print dry for about 10 minutes. This is because most card absorbs moisture and retains it far more than paper does. Cutting damp paper or card usually results in tearing.

Then I scored all the fold lines. The thin black lines that stop at the outline / edge of the box are the guide-lines to the fold lines.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - pattern with score and cut lines

Then I cut around all the black outlines, so that there was no black outline showing on the box itself.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - vintage suchard ready to fold

 

There is now a choice to be made:

If you would like a flat-pack cardboard box: fold the sides of the box towards the centre, so that the tab is in the middle, and glue the tab to the side of the box (see second photo below). The tab remains unfolded and flat. It is also in the middle of the folded box.

If you would like a fully assembled box, there is a trick that helps to ensure ‘square’ corners.

First make all the creases (fairly lightly)
NOTE: I forgot to do this. It isn’t essential, just helpful

Then, keeping the edges of the flaps lined up, fold the box so that the flap is in the middle

making a miniature cardboard box - fold the side flap in first

Fold the other side in and glue the flap to the edge of the box.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 2

I have made creases in the fold lines in this photo

Then squash the box open and re-fold it, with the glued edge at the side.

If you have scored the lines exactly and cut exactly, the box should fold flat both ways, and it should look ‘square’ when opened out.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 3

If the glue is damp and you need to adjust the box, now is the time to do it.

I think it is easier to fold the square boxes as you can line up all the cut edges more easily.

making miniature cardboard boxes - folding straight lines

With oblong boxes, I make the first fold in the centre of the box. This seems to make it easier to fold the rest of the box more accurately.  I don’t know why it does, but it does.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 4

If you have made the creases in the fold lines first, folding over the bottom flaps of the box should not be difficult.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 5

I used a small amount of glue to hold the flaps down.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 6

I wanted the boxes to dry with flat bottoms, so I filled them with ceramic baking beads, but anything small and heavy will do.

dolls' house cardboard boxes - making 7

I had a look and you can even get Ceramic Baking Beans from Amazon !

***   ***   ***

WHY I DON’T MAKE DOWNLOADS FOR SALE

I don’t think making things from downloads is easy. (I don’t think making the downloads themselves is ‘easy’ either).

This type of box, in particular, is a good example of what I would call ‘harder than it looks’.

In addition, in this particular case, experience has taught me that there is a limited market for boxes – mainly because most people seem to need a box that I haven’t made yet.

Added to which, I am convinced that if I did make this sort of box into a sale-able download (no matter what guidance notes I wrote for the download) I would then have to spend half my time explaining about different sorts of card – not to mention asking people what sort of printer they had and how it was set up.

That is why these are freely available for you to use and customise and share.

But please always bear in mind that the printer, ink and the card that you use will make a big difference to the result that you get.

***  ***  ***

“What are you going to do with them?” asked my neighbour, as she was leaving and I had to tell her that they were going to get thrown away as they were my equivalent of a sketch pad and that I had been trying various things out when I made them.

So she asked if she could have another box too, because it had given her an idea:

wills's cigarette card -making a simple doll's house - not to scale

THE POLL

Some of these boxes were made from card / paper that isn’t available on Amazon (!!!): the German lamp box, for example, is made from a piece of real-size paper handkerchief box. (It is possible to peel the glossy, coated image off some packaging and use the smooth side of the card to print on.)

If you would like to try any of these out, please vote for which one(s) you would like in the poll below.

doll house cardboard boxes - 7 different ones

It may be a month before I am able to blog again, but I won’t forget about the boxes.

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The 1970s Revisited

Betsey Clark - Doll House Card, with figures, full size

Betsey Clark Doll House Card – Hallmark copyright 1975

I have a new camera. It is a Sony Cybershot DSC-W830 and so far it has been amazing. All the photos in this post were taken with it on an overcast, rainy day in June. No artificial lights were used and I haven’t ‘tweaked’ the photos in any way . I have simply cut out the bits that I wanted and, on my computer screen at least, the soft, pearly-grey light in the pictures exactly captures the daylight as it was on the day I took the photos .

If anyone is interested in the electronic wizardry that made this possible, the technical specifications are available (like the camera itself) on Amazon.

***   ***   ***

I am now going to do something mildly naughty. The following cards were produced by companies that are still in business and, as they are copyright to those companies, I suspect that I should not have uploaded any sort of copy of them here.

Betsey Clark Doll House Card – Hallmark – folded size, when detached from the header and with figures removed for use, 8 1/2  x 6 1/2 inches (21 x 16.6 cm)

I have had this card for a long time, but I knew nothing about Betsey Clark until very recently when I did some research on the internet and came across this site: The Betsey Zone

This is the only information that I have been able to find about her on-line, which surprised me as she was evidently well known enough to have her name prominently featured on a card that she had designed.

My particular card was bought in Britain and it seems to vary slightly from the American version in that it is a ‘Doll House Card’ and not a ‘Party Favor Card’.

I only know about this difference because, at the time of typing this there, are a several of these cards for sale on eBay in the US. Apart from the description on the header card they all look identical to mine. (The price of $1.50 is printed on the US header cards.)

Betsey Clark Doll House - Card Header UK Version

I remember this style of illustration so clearly that, when I recently came across this card again, I was staggered that it is now over 40 years old.

As old as the card is, Hallmark is still in business and the copyright is still in place. This brings me to the mildly naughty part and so, before I go any further, I had better make the following clear:

I do not make, and have never made, a miniature version of this card for profit.

If you would like to make my version of this design, please remember that it is intended for your personal enjoyment only and that is not intended for re-sale, in any way shape or form.

That said, please read on –

I have not attempted to reproduce the complete card here. There are only three characters, plus the table. And, at 1 1/4 inches (3.2 cm) tall, it is slightly larger than 12th scale. The image in the pdf is a high resolution one and so, if you would like to make a smaller version, it might be possible to re-size the image without too much loss of detail. Trying to make it much bigger will be a waste of time.

If you do make one of these for yourself, please be aware that the card, paper, ink and printer used will affect the result you get.

I have an elderly Canon Pixmar inkjet printer and I used:

  • Thin, white card (140gsm) – card with a smooth surface is best
  • Water based glue (and a paintbrush)
  • A sharp knife
  • A sharp pair of scissors
  • A ruler
  • A blunt kitchen knife for scoring the fold line

You do need card that takes printer ink nicely, without blurring or bleeding.

 

To make the card:

You will need the pdf
(You don’t need to download the pdf to your computer, you should be able to print it from the screen.)

On the pdf:
The blue lines show where a line should be scored
The red lines show where straight cuts should be made – (there are no red lines around the figures, or under the table)

I allowed the print to dry for at least 10 minutes, as scoring or cutting even slightly damp card can result in a damaged surface or a ragged edge.

I then scored the fold lines across the room setting, as indicated by the blue lines.

Then I cut out the card, as indicated by the red lines – Initially, when I tried to do this without the red lines, I struggled to see where the pale edge disappeared into white background.

The original card folds up in a zig-zag fashion, but if you would like to do something different, there is no reason why you shouldn’t (see photos below).

I folded the table, so that it stood out from the wall, and then stuck it in place over the figure standing on the stool – there are guidelines printed on the wall and these need to be just hidden by the table.

the table goes in front of the girl standing in the stool

If you would like to be true to the original design, the table slots into the wall with tabs. It will, inevitably, not stand up straight without a great deal of coaxing. I have never found a folded paper table that stood straight the first time round.

The figures are small. I didn’t score the fold points in the support strip that is supposed to make them stand upright because I didn’t want to weaken, or damage it.

I cut the lines around the strip using a ruler and knife; then I used scissors to cut out the characters, and only then did I ‘Z Fold’ the strip .

z-fold

As, I have said before, the thing that annoys me about full-size paper dolls is that they fall over very easily.

Putting a ‘Z Fold’ in the support does make them more stable. But I wanted these to be really VERY stable and so I used a tiny amount of glue and attached them to the walls of the room.

I applied the glue only along the surface indicated by the green line, in the photo above.

betsey clark doll house card dolls house size

If you fix the figures to the walls by their support strips, and are careful about where you place them, it is possible to make a card that folds up with the figures inside.

 

Betsey Clark Card House in miniature - figures fixed in place

The way the card is folded and where the figures are positioned can make a big difference to the overall appearance.

Betsey Clark Card House in miniature - walls in Open C position

Betsey Clark Card House in miniature - walls in Z Fold position

***   ***   ***

Just in case I have given everyone the idea that everything in the 1970s was all in the Betsey Clark style, there is another card below which dates from the same era. This one was produced by the Medici Press, in the UK. As well as having the figures to cut out and room setting, it has a very brief story inside.

Inside the card, the pictures and story are both credited to Nicola Pindar. She is not listed on the Medici website of current artists and I have not contacted the various Nicola Pindars who I have found on-line, to ask if this is their early work.

Medici card - designed by NicolaPindar

Size, when folded, 9 1/2  x 7 inches (24 x 17.67 cm)

Nicola Pindar - paper doll card

Back of card

The Medici Press still produce a vast number of high quality cards, including vintage designs by Molly Brett, Racey Helps and Margaret Tarrant. This type of card is rather out of their usual range today, but it is a classic example of the colours and design style that were widely used (in the UK at least) in the early to mid 1970’s.

Finally, many thanks to everyone who voted in last week’s poll. Your answers are very helpful. I am told that the polls (and certain other things) do not work in the Firefox browser. I am sorry about this; unfortunately it is not something that I can do anything about.

***   ***   ***

I must stop now and go and do some work. But before I go, one last picture:

ark from Nicola Pindar, Victorian room setting card - Medici Press

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The trouble is that, although are a great many things that I would like to do, I don’t have a great deal of spare time at the moment. In addition to this, as soon as I make a plan, it seems to me that Fate decides that there are other things that I need to do, elsewhere, immediately, right now and urgently.

So, just in case Fate is reading this, I am absolutely not planning to do anything here. I just happened to have some things scanned and this is as good a place to store them as anywhere else…

The Cards:

Fiddler’s Green (postcards) – all 6 1/8 x 4 3/8 inches

pdf – full size images

The backs of the cards differ:

Antique Shop – Fiddler’s Green Construction Cards (printed by PERCY GILKES Printers, Banbury 4928)

Witches Hovel / Working Narrow BOTH – Boat Fiddler’s Green, 2 Parsons Street, Banbury, Oxon – Fun Construction Cards (printed by PERCY GILKES Printers, Banbury, BOTH 4928)

I always thought of these cards were about as British as could be, but a quick look at the internet produced an on-line Fiddler’s Green paper model making site

The site looks intensely American to me and I admire their Awesome New England Model Village a great deal.

*** *** ***

Shaberay (birthday card) – The Cards with a Difference – Bedford, England. No 0028 – folded size, just over 8 x 5 inches

Shaberay Birthday Crad from the 1970s - House and green house to cut out and make up

I don’t know anything about Shaberay, beyond what is printed on the card, and I have been unable to find out anything about the company on-line. There are a few more examples of their cards on Eric’s Vintage Card site.

pdf – full size card (house only)

pdf – dolls’ house size card (interior and exterior of card)

To make a dolls’ house sized card please use the pdf above:
First, score along line A, then cut out the card.
Fold the paper in two, along the score line, and glue it together.
Let it dry and then score and fold it along the original crease line;  then trim as you feel is necessary.

saberay_happy_birthday_card_house_resized_not_to_scale

A (short) explanation:

Very briefly, I am rather busy at the moment and it takes a fair amount of time to produce a blog post that includes photos, scans, pdfs, text etc.

One of the reasons for writing this post was to estimate how much time it takes me to do certain things.

(Yes, it would shorten the blog writing process considerably if I did not digress and comment and try to explain everything  🙂 )

Bearing in mind that I do not spend much time in front of a computer, I would like to use that time wisely and try to upload things here which are useful and of interest to you – which brings me to:

The Poll:

The poll below is anonymous to use. It will end, automatically, in one week.

It is there because I am trying to get a feel for what sort of printable items you, the reader, would like to make (either with or without explanations and instructions).

One reason for doing this is because I am planning to delete the contents of the printables page at the end of this week, in order to make way for some things that I have tried out and I know work well.

This just a plan and as such it may never happen.  🙂

 

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A M Davis (London) Cut Out and Colour Farm Set

(Apologies for the poor quality photo. Mission: BUY A CAMERA THAT WORKS is in progress.)

There is something about the original set of cards for this farm set that baffles my scanner. The full-size prints looked all right, but all sorts of odd things happened when I tried to scan them back into the computer, or to resize the scanned images on screen.

Luckily, in our local newsagents, there is a photocopier that appears to be ancient and decrepit. It wheezes and rattles and hesitates and then produces photocopies on white-hot paper. More importantly, in this particular instance, it is so low-tech that it just copies things and does not do whatever it is that my scanner does.

I can’t honestly say that the photocopies it produced for me earlier this week are the cleanest I have ever seen, but they have made this blog post possible and I came home with a sheaf of paper and the feeling that things were now going to go well.

My scanner, however, being defeated in its attempts to thwart me, had evidently communicated with my printer, which promptly decided that it was about to run out of ink. (No, I don’t keep spare cartridges to hand. I am convinced that the minute I stock-pile some the printer will stop working altogether.) And this is why the test run that I printed, instead of being black and white, has a blue-violet tinge to it. Even taking the ink cartridges out and shaking them and re-inserting them did not help this time.

A M Davis (London) Farm Set to Cut Out and Colour

While I was coaxing the last sheet out of my printer My Nearest and Dearest (one of My Nearest and Dearest) conceived the idea that it would be rash to release a whole farm set into the unsuspecting universe as they might be copied and used to produce fakes.

I honestly can’t imagine why anyone would wish to do this, or that it could possibly be worth anyone’s while to do it. But, as the matter had been raised, I promised that I would make it as clear as I could that this is NOT a complete set and that there are only 8 cards reproduced in the pdf below (and there should be, as far as I know) 12 cards in total.

Anyway, to shorten what is turning into a long story, I used thin, cheap card for my example and was pleased at how well everything fitted together.

Ideally, if I make the full size set again, I think I will use 200gsm card. Then it would be possible to cut around the legs of the horse and in between the wheel spokes, without fear of them becoming too flimsy.

So now, without further ado, here is a pdf of the large size farm set: Paper_Model_Farm_AM_Davis_OHM20170601

And here is ‘dolls’ house size’ farm set (it isn’t 12th scale):
Miniature_Farm_AM_Davis_OHM20170601m
The positions of the folds and cuts can be seen in the pdf for the bigger version.

NB: These are for your personal use and enjoyment, please do not re-print them and sell them as modern, vintage or antique cards or card sets.

A M DAVIS farm and garden - colour

Photograph – but not taken by me

There is a pdf for the colour version (just the house and garden, as shown above):
OHM_Farm_and_Garden_20170524 and the basic instructions for putting it together are in a previous post here

Finally:

My Nearest and Dearest, having triumphed in the ‘What About Fakes?’ debate, and asked to be a Severe Critic and read this before I pressed the Publish Button, suggested that it might be a good idea to explain why I going to the bother of getting a decent print of this cut-out paper model, not to mention why am I making part of it available here.

The short answer is that I need a decent print for a project that I am working on.
And, having tried the full-size model out, I think it would be a pity for it to vanish back into my ‘Why Have You Got This and Can You Get Rid of It?’ box.
And I hope that if you enjoy paper models you will have fun with it too.

 

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2017 !  How did it get to be 2017 ?
I didn’t think it had been that long since I wrote something for this blog.

There should be a nice photograph here. But I don’t have a camera at the moment and the results that I got from the Android Tablet that I borrowed were a bit… odd…

So you are going to have to take my word for it that the images below are of a really a rather nice little model farmhouse sitting in its own garden, and propped up at a peculiar angle either on the cap of a tube of toothpaste or a cork.
open_house_miniatures_Card_farm_house_put_together  open_house_miniatures_card_farm_house_put_together-size

The farmhouse is something that I was trying out today and, while I was struggling with a knife blade that wanted to break and paper that wanted to tear, not to mention disbelieving the way the card I was using absorbed water-based glue like a sponge and went soggy, I thought that, as well as being relatively simple to make (just don’t use the card I tried using first of all), the finished farmhouse would look good in a miniature nursery, school-room or shop.

And so here, if you would like to try making this for yourself, is a pdf of the parts for you to play with too:
OHM_Farm_and_Garden_20170524
UPDATE: 3rd June 2017 – black and white versions of an 8 card set are now in this post

The usual request remains the same: make the model, share it and, if you want to, sell the finished article (but think of all the other people who will do this too), but please don’t re-sell the pdf or the artwork itself.

Instructions for putting the model together:
The paper or card that you use and your printer ink will affect the finish and the colours you get. 
If you have never made anything this small before and would like to see detailed, step by step pictures for a similar project, please take a look here at another small house on a base – the walkthrough is towards the end of the post (which is much shorter than this one!)

Materials:
I used 200gsm paper and water-based glue, which I applied with a brush.
This was mainly for speed, as this was a trial run for me.
Printing on a thin paper and gluing this to thin card would work equally as well.
The main thing is that you need something that will hold its shape when folded and will not fall apart when glued.
Note: If you glue 2 sheets of paper, or paper and card together, make sure they are completely dry before cutting them out.

First (for reference only) look at the picture below:
The fold lines are marked in red and the slots that need to be cut out are marked in blue.
These lines are fine and black on the pdf and, if you don’t know what you are looking for, they are easy to miss.

Reference picture for A M Davis farmhouse and Garden Kit

What I did:
Scored along the fold lines first. 
Then cut the slots out, cutting away from the corners.
Then cut around the outlines.
Then made the creases in the various parts – centre roof, house walls, etc.

I found that it was best to fit the front of the house into the roof first and then fit the back to these two pieces once they were assembled. A little bit of glue inside the house, applied with a paintbrush, will hold all the parts together.

The hedges fit around the outside of the garden base.
A small amount of glue, applied with a paintbrush, and left to dry on the thin edge of the garden base is helpful. Once this is dry, another thin layer of glue can be applied and the hedges should adhere to this without giving too much trouble.

I assembled the garden so that the coloured part of the hedge was on the inside and, when it was all in I place, I discovered that there was a significant gap between the front hedge and the garden base.

So, after I had glued the house to the back and the base and was certain that everything was dry and fairly stable, I made a second base out of two layers of card.
I measured and cut this to be a little bit wider than the original base. The new, slightly larger, base makes a tiny ledge around the sides and also strengthens and neatens the appearance of the whole thing.

The white, unprinted card and the cut edges now looked a bit stark to me, so I washed some thin water-based paint over them – green for the base and the outside of the hedges and light orange for the chimneys.

I am sorry that I do not have the means of taking better photos at the moment – this is a nice little model and deserves a better picture than I can achieve right now.

A Minor Point :
The original cards are about A5 in size. This would be very small if reduced to 12th scale, so this model is not 12th scale, just a useful sort of size for a dolls’ house.

About the Cards :
There are 12 cards in the set that I have. They were published by A M Davis, Quality Cards & Co (London).

.A M Davis - Quality Cards Logo

The original cards are uncoloured line drawings. I made copies and coloured some of those. (This was a lengthy process as they were probably lithographed and the interference dot-matrix pattern, or whatever it is, is appalling. It would have been quicker to draw my own design out.)
The set is undated and I have no information about the original publisher.
A quick look on the internet did not  make me much better informed about them, but I did find two enjoyable sites, which are worth a look if you are interested in vintage cards:

http://www.postcardy.com/article04.html

http://vintagerecycling.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/am-davis-quality-cards.html

If you are interested in making paper based projects like this one there are a few more available on this page

Finally:
I have always said my photographs are awful, but this has to be a new low point.

open_house_miniatures_dollshouse_farm_and_garden_a_m_davis_original

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open-house-miniatures-glitter-christmas-trees

These date from a time when I was trying to fit many Christmas decorations into a very small space.

open-house-miniatures-slot-together-christmas-tree

  • Glue two sheets of thin card (140gsm each) together
  • Glue the paper pattern (photocopy paper, probably 80gsm) to the card
  • Place under a flat,heavy weight and allow to dry completely before cutting out
  • Cut out slot first
  • Then cut out tree (cut away from the inner corners towards the outer edge)
  • The raised surface at the cut edge may be removed by burnishing with the back of a metal tea spoon
  • Test fit and make adjustments

Decorating is a matter of choice. I did all of the following:

  • Paint
  • Allow to dry completely
  • Glitter (this is the fun but messy bit)
  • Allow to dry completely

I ran out of time, daylight and ideas when it came to photographing the finished trees, which is a pity because I like them and think that they cast pretty shadows.

 

open-house-miniatures-leave-the-fancy-photography-to-the-experts

open-house-miniatures-christmas-tree-pattern

I don’t know what size the above pattern will be when viewed / printed on another computer / printer, but the trees in the pdf below should print at 1 inch (2.5 cm) tall, which is the size of the examples I made.

OHM_011215_1_inch_Christmas_tree

 

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The Not Very Encouraging News

  1. My camera is not working reliably
  2. My little home printer is not working at all

Result: no paper projects to do on this blog until above are fixed or replaced

The Good News

  1. The scanner part of my printer is working. (I am not saying that it does a wonderful job, but at least it is working)

The “Oh no, what now…” News

Due to building work at home, alot of my things have been in store.

While in store, some things evidently became damp (see foxing on scan of card below)

example of foxing due to damp

Foxing (the brown spots) is the result of a type of mould and I have to go through everything and check / air / scan / throw away / make tough decisions about it.

While doing this, I thought that I should make the effort to digitize my paper-based archive. [Archive, in this case = a very grand word for a box of postcards, scraps and other miscellaneous junk.]

However, I have so much to do (in general) at the moment that I cannot – must not – spend more than 1 hour a day sitting in front of my computer.

Despite this, in an unwise(?) but praiseworthy(?) attempt to share what I thought might be useful to other people interested in making miniature things, I created a page called Printables on this blog.

I then came swiftly to the conclusion that:

  1. My idea of what is “useful” may not be universally “useful”
  2. I will soon run out of storage space, if I add full size images randomly
  3. Looking through lots of thumbnail sized images on a computer screen is tedious

Result: a suggestion that is going to end in disappointment for some people.

The suggestion is this:

There should be a comments box on this page and, if you would like to, you can leave a message there letting me know what would be useful to you. Please be as specific as you can, for example magazines is good, but magazines (fashion, 1950s) would be even better.

This would be a great help to me, as I could spend more time scanning and less time uploading (not at all useful) images here.

A couple of things to bear in mind, please:

  1. My 1 Hour a Day Computer Rule
  2. There are only 24 hours in a day and I do my best to be asleep for at least 6 of them

Finally:

Below is the result of one hour’s work. Most of the time was taken up by typing the descriptions and double checking that the right description was with the right card and how they were displayed on screen etc., etc., etc. This means that any scans I upload here are not going to have detailed written descriptions.

And I can’t decide if the following should be called: “cigarette cards“, “lithographic prints” or “possible miniature theatre scenery“, so please don’t be surprised if images are not classified as you think they should be.

No. 2 of 25 Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings -

No. 2 of 25 Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“Dutch Boats off Flushing”
De Reszke Cigarettes – J Millhoff & Co Ltd.

Cigarette Cards No. 20 (of 80) in the series Evolution of the British Navy - no manufacturer name given.

No. 20 (of 80) in the series Evolution of the British Navy
– no manufacturer name given.

Cigarette card - No. 19 (of 25)

No. 19 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“Dutch Boats in a Calm”
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

Cigarette Card - No. 3 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 3 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
Dedham Mill
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

Cigarette Card - No. 12 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 12 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“The Valley of the Llugwy”
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

No. 7 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 7 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
The Stream
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

 

* * *

Afterword

I don’t sponsor any advertisements on this blog

WordPress need to make money in order to run their blogging service and so they sell advertising space.

I could, by paying WordPress a small fee, make this blog advert free – nice as this would be, it’s not going to happen soon.

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