Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Pattern’ Category

The 'E' House completed - and outsize house plan

I am going to count this house as one of my notable failures.

The most glaring fault is the room divider between the kitchen and the hall. It isn’t wide enough to hold the full length of the ground floor securely. It is all right if you don’t wiggle the ground floor, but someone is almost certainly going to be tempted to do this at some point.

Added to which, I don’t like dolls’ houses with walls that are covered in pictures of furniture. (This is very narrow-minded of me.)

All in all it is an idea that needs more work than I have time to give it (at the moment).

That said, I still think that it was a fun idea. So if you would like to try making The ‘E’ House for yourself, the plans are at the end of this blog entry. There are also a list of the materials that I used and basic written instructions (sorry, no slideshow this time).

If you would like to know how I struggled with an idea that did not turn out as I hoped, read on (and avoid the pitfalls that I fell in to):

The Idea was:

  • A bright, modern dolls’ house
  • Slender so that could hang on a wall
  • With something ‘different’ about it

I ended up with this design:

The 'E' House - basic structure

– which is not what I call exciting, innovative or even encouraging – even though I daringly off-set the wall dividers.

With a nod to the distinctive, exciting and innovative house designed by Laurie Simmons and Peter Wheelwright for Bozart

The Kaleidescope House - conceived and designed by Laurie Simmons and architect Peter Wheelwright.

I had wondered about incorporating some plastic panels (the plastic came from the covers of a couple of ring binders)

The 'E' House - plastic panels

The second floor has an indent to accommodate the panel

– but looking at the panels, once they were in place, I wanted them to move – either to slide or to swing open and this would have meant framing the panels so that they could be hinged effectively.

So I abandoned the plastic panels – which I still think were a good idea – and decided to have an open plan house.

But what was I going to do with the inside?

I did try some tiny print wallpapers but, because you can see the whole house in a glance, they had to be very nearly identical or they clashed – horribly.

I must have been fairly desperate at this point because I considered a tried and trusted decorative style, which I truly dislike.

The 'E' House - interior papers (on card)

This is what I ended up with. Don’t ask how long it took. Just don’t.

I dislike ‘furniture wallpaper’ (as I call it) so much that I despaired and decided to try paint, and spray-painted the house with fast drying, spirit-based paint. It was supposed to be white paint, but it turned out to be cream, and it brought out the ‘grain’ of the cut edges. (This is avoidable; I had been lazy and hadn’t sealed the edges before painting).

The 'E' House - spray painted

I spray paint out of doors, in a box lined with removable paper. As a change from my usual problem with rain, it was so hot that the paint was almost dry as soon as it left the can.

Maybe more COLOUR was the answer ?!

The 'E' House - side view - painted roof

It was at this point, and feeling rather grim, that I decided to call this The ‘E’ House (‘E’ for Everlasting, not Elizabeth) and throw it away before I wasted any more time on it. Needless to say: I failed to throw it away.

The following day, the tricky manoeuvre of fitting the decorative papers into the house – which was already firmly glued together – was accomplished.

After which I really would have been happy to throw house away and never try to make anything like it ever again. Ever.

Luckily, shortly after this, a surprise visitor turned up and the house found a new home elsewhere – thank goodness !

The 'E' House - and new owner

Finished size:

Height: 1 and 3/4 inches (4.4 cm)

Width: just under 2 inches (5 cm)

Depth: just over 3/4 of an inch (2 cm)

Materials:

pdf of the house plans – OHM_201809_’E’_House-plans

pdf of the interior decoration – OHM_201809_’E’_House-interior

  • Basic home printer
  • Mountboard (I used A4 Daler Rowney from Amazon)
    I think it is called ‘Matboard’ or ‘Mounting Board’ in the United States
  • Laminated printer paper (like this)
  • Basic printer paper
  • A very sharp knife (I use a craft knife with a blade that snaps off – like this)
  • A metal ruler
  • A solid surface on which to cut the mountboard
  • White wood-working glue (I used Evostick)
  • A small paintbrush
  • Paint (of your choice – I would avoid watercolour paint because it fades relatively quickly)
  • Varnish (of your choice)
  • I do not recommend using a hairdryer or heat gun to speed up the drying process. In my experience, the intense heat from both of these tends to warp the mountboard

Please remember that the materials that you use will affect the look of the house. For example: laminated printer paper gives a much crisper look than even good quality card (see below) and the thickness of card / board used will affect the overall appearance considerably.

The 'E' House - difference in printing results

What I suggest doing:

Print the decorative papers on the laminated printer paper and set them aside to dry

The 'E' House - wall panels

Print the house plan on basic printer paper

Stick the basic paper to the mountboard
Let this dry completely (under a book or other heavy weight to keep it flat, if necessary)

Cut out the house pieces carefully – it is up to you whether you would like an indented second floor or not

Check that the floors and back wall match in length exactly

Measure the width of the dividing walls and cut strips of mountboard of the required width

Seal all the cut edges of the mountboard with a thin layer of glue (this should give you a better finish that my spray painted effort)
Let the glue dry completely

Paint the mountboard with paint of your choice – top tip: don’t use very watery paint. If you do it will un-stick the glue and make the mount-board swell up
Let the paint dry completely

Glue the Ground Floor to the bottom edge of the Back Wall.

The 'E' House - back view

The roof sits on top of the back wall and the ground floor is in front of the back wall.
Always let the glue dry completely

Glue the decorative paper for the back of the rooms to the back of the house – you will probably need to trim the kitchen and hall floor, so that it looks ‘right’

Alternatively, you can glue each room down individually.
Let this dry completely

While it is drying, glue the decorative panels to the strips of mountboard that you have cut. The panels do not have to be cut to an exact height at this point, but they do have to have the ‘correct’ panels in place e.g. nursery/ bedroom, bedroom / bathroom, kitchen / hall.
Let these dry completely

Then cut the kitchen / hall room divider so that it fits the space between the Ground Floor and the Second Floor and glue it in place
Let it dry completely

Glue the second floor into place
Let it dry completely

Cut the remaining room dividers so that they reach ceiling height – cut the top at the angle of the roof if you wish – and glue them in place
Let them dry completely

Glue the roof in place. I didn’t cut angles for the apex of the roof. Angled joints seem to be out of fashion of at the moment, so I simply left a small gully.
NB Working with the back of the house on a flat surface will make it easier to get a neat join at the back
Let the glue dry completely

Repaint the roof and the back of the house. Re-touch any other paint work that needs it.

(optional) When the paint is dry, seal the surfaces with a varnish of your choice – the varnish used for finishing does depend on what paint you have used. I used a mixture of acrylic paints for the red. The off-white colour was fast-drying spray paint. The spray paint was a bad choice because it raised the grain on the cut edges of the board, but it does have a nice shiny finish on the surface of the mountboard

*  *   *

Finally:

As with all the projects that are freely available on this blog: Please don’t sell the plans for this house, or the interior decoration.

If you would like to sell the house that you make, please think about the ground floor and find a way to make it more stable : )

If you decide to make a replica / tribute to the Bozart Kaleidoscope House in miniature, a credit to the designers would be appreciated:

http://www.lauriesimmons.net/projects/kaleidoscope-house

*  *   *

About the adverts:

WordPress sometimes places advertisments on the blogs that they host: they need the money to keep WordPress on-line.

By paying a small amount of money I could have these advertisements removed. I choose not to do this – I need every penny for paint, and glue, and card, and paper, and wood, and all sorts of other things too.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

annina_distons_cushion

I think these cushions, which are in one of Annina Diston’s miniature homes, are a wonderful example how a simple designs can be used to great effect.

They lured me away from my search for a new camera and I spent far too long admiring them – and other examples of Annina’s work on Flickr

 

annina_diston_photograph_from_flckr

annina_diston_photograph_of_dollshouse

I came across her work while I was trying to escape a bad case of techno-fatigue. I seem to have spent months reading about camera sensors and lenses and f-stops and goodness knows what else. All the afore mentioned appear to have a impact on the performance (and price) of a camera, but they don’t actually mean much to me and I hoped that the dexterous and skilled photographers, who put their work on Flickr, might have listed what camera they used for which photo and possibly how much they had ‘tweaked’ their photo before uploading it. (Vain hope, but it was worth a try.)

Anyway, when I saw Aninna’s cushions I remembered that I had a plate of elegant embroidery designs from the French company Dollfus-Mieg et Cie that I wanted to share here.

The designs are easy to work and, if embroidered on 22 count canvas, make attractive miniature cushions, stool covers, chair seats, etc.

dmc - dollfus mieg et cie - embroidery plate

The original plate is quite small, so I have resized it to fit onto an A4 piece of paper. If you have trouble printing from the on-screen image, here is link to the pdf: OHM_DMC_20170601

Finally, in conclusion:

I had two things that I wanted to do this week, one was finding a new camera to buy: no luck there… the search continues

The second involved writing a blog post. This isn’t the blog post that I was planning to write, but (fingers crossed) with any luck I might be able to complete that tomorrow…

Read Full Post »

open-house-miniatures-glitter-christmas-trees

These date from a time when I was trying to fit many Christmas decorations into a very small space.

open-house-miniatures-slot-together-christmas-tree

  • Glue two sheets of thin card (140gsm each) together
  • Glue the paper pattern (photocopy paper, probably 80gsm) to the card
  • Place under a flat,heavy weight and allow to dry completely before cutting out
  • Cut out slot first
  • Then cut out tree (cut away from the inner corners towards the outer edge)
  • The raised surface at the cut edge may be removed by burnishing with the back of a metal tea spoon
  • Test fit and make adjustments

Decorating is a matter of choice. I did all of the following:

  • Paint
  • Allow to dry completely
  • Glitter (this is the fun but messy bit)
  • Allow to dry completely

I ran out of time, daylight and ideas when it came to photographing the finished trees, which is a pity because I like them and think that they cast pretty shadows.

 

open-house-miniatures-leave-the-fancy-photography-to-the-experts

open-house-miniatures-christmas-tree-pattern

I don’t know what size the above pattern will be when viewed / printed on another computer / printer, but the trees in the pdf below should print at 1 inch (2.5 cm) tall, which is the size of the examples I made.

OHM_011215_1_inch_Christmas_tree

 

Read Full Post »

A Savonnerie Style Rug

open house miniatures needlework carpet lucinda pink - computer generated

Computer generated image to give idea of colours. 

Once upon a time… and it does seem a long time ago now – I wrote a blog post called To Sew or Not to Sew about a needlework carpet design that I had created from one of my printed carpet patterns.

Well, I did finish the carpet… eventually… and I thought that it looked very, very good and much nicer than the picture at the top of this blog post, but it is not a symmetrical pattern and it does take ages and ages and ages and ages and then some to embroider, so I filed it away in my (ahem) not very good filing system as something that needed thinking about and simplifying (a lot).

However, there seem to be a few brave souls out there who would actually like to try working one of these and have asked if I will share the pattern.

Now the problem that I have at the moment is that, due to circumstances beyond my control, my computer is in storage (if I start to tell you why it is in storage I will not stop and I suspect that you will become terribly bored because this is not a blog about leaky showers and electrical wiring, although I suspect I could be quite entertaining about wallpaper paste…)

Anyway, the end result is that I have a list of things of things that I promised I would do and now can’t do because of heaps of other things that I must now do first.

Having said that, this morning I conducted a dawn raid on my computer, grabbed some files and am now sitting in front of the computer of a kind and generous friend and about to type a brief list which I hope will be helpful.

  • This is not an easy carpet to work – for one thing the design is not symmetrical
  • A frame is, in my opinion, essential
  • I had to put in the central guidelines in coloured cotton (I removed these after completing the carpet although some people work over them)
  • I had to be very careful not to get huge lumps of thread at the back (there are a lot of colours in a small space)
  • It helped to think of the project as “painting with thread” and not just working a charted design – that way I didn’t get too worried if I put a stitch in not exactly the right place…
  • I think, in order to get a good result, it is essential to start from the middle and work outwards
  • I would recommend picking a bit that looks easy to you and try a small test patch first – see how your thread and canvas work together
  • Be kind to yourself, if you are new to needlework, try working the outside brown border and see how you get on.

Here are my colour charts – if you want to work a symmetrical carpet, work the central motif and then pick the corner that you like best and work that round the outside (I’m sorry, I can’t do reverse patterns at the moment).

And here are the black and white ones that I made. They drove me distracted – but you may prefer working with this sort of chart and it would make working the carpet in a different colour-way easier if you use these (I’m sorry, I can’t do a set of charts in different colours at the moment).

You will need to find your own colours. I used embroidery thread on 22 point canvas and I used a thinner thread than I usually do. Threads vary and you will need to experiment to find what suits you.

Here is a screen grab of the colours that the computer programme suggested, as you can see there is quite a subtle mix, but

OMH_Lucinda-carpet_colours

The colour blocks that look as though they are the same colour, are the same colour – this is where I combined all the very close shades into one colour that I liked.

Making up the carpet – (this sort of carpet was not usually fringed)

I can thoroughly recommend Janet Granger’s online tutorial on how to hem a miniature carpet.

I use a slightly different method and ideally I would like to make a slideshow how I finish mine, but I’m sorry to say that it is another one of those things that I will have to put of my To Do List.

Speaking of which, next on the list is –

  • Full Bilderbuch for Maria in Argentina

Well, I grabbed the file for that this morning, so all I need now is paper and glue and a printer and some time and space…

***   ***   ***

Afterword

I don’t host any advertising on this weblog.

If you see adverts then they were put there by WordPress, who have to make money in order to maintain this blog site.

By paying WordPress a small yearly fee I could arrange for there to be no advertisements on this weblog. I am too mean / poor to do this.

Read Full Post »

Open House Miniatures - Rose and Forget-me-not needlework miniature cushion

The Great Tidy Up is still in progress, and I unearthed these cushions some time ago.

I been waiting (not very patiently) for a little bit of sunshine in order to photograph them because the chart really doesn’t show the design to advantage.

They are worked in wool on 22 count canvas and are backed with thick silk from an old shirt, and are roughly one and half inches square (3.8 cm)

(I just kept working the background until it was the size that looked right to me.)

They were a little bit fiddly to embroider, but I think that they repaid the effort.

Open House Miniatures - Rose and Forget-me-not miniature needlework chart

To enlarge the chart, just click on it.

This chart is rather lurid and bright because it makes the different colours easier to identify.

The original (Victorian) chart was rather faded and not at all easy to follow.

Later the same day…

I have just asked about colours for this pattern –

Well, in the cushions that I worked there are –

3 blues (dark blue, mid-blue and pale blue) – these are distinctly different shades.

Lemon yellow (for the centre of the forget-me-nots)

3 greens (dark green, mid-green, paler green) – the dark green and the mid green blend and the paler green is quite a bit paler.

And for the rose –

1 pale pink, 1 dusky pink, 1 deepish “rose” hue, 1 “rose” red

Just off-white for the background.

***   ***   ***   ***

I think it is fun to play with the colour combinations and make something that is entirely your own and right for your house.

For example, the design works well with a white to blush pink/apricot roses, pink to red forget-me-nots and bronze / green foliage.

Read Full Post »

Meet Noah…

Open House Miniatures - Sock Bear Noah

Somewhere I have a “proper” pattern for a bear.

Somewhere…

Unfortunately my (non-existent) filing system let me down (again) and I had to start again from scratch.

Noah is therefore exceeding handmade and, because I am not very fond of sewing, I cheated a great deal when I made him.

Experienced makers of miniature bears do not look at the slideshow at the bottom of this page – it will upset you – and whatever you do, do not use my pattern.

Open House Miniatures - sock bear  called Noah

This is not a pdf file so
I have no idea what size this will print.

Instead, please go to a website where you can download a professionally designed teddy bear and re-size that.

There are quite a few websites to choose from –

www.planet-teddybear.com

www.sewingsupport.com

www.bearycheap.com

Everyone else…

***   ***   ***   ***

Noah is a distantly related to Sock the Elephant and, like Sock, he is not for sale.

Read Full Post »

Meet Sock…

open_house_miniatures_sock_elephant_5

Sock is an Easter elephant – and I promised someone that I would write about him “properly” on this blog.

Sock is unique and most definitely not for sale.

His name probably explains a great deal about him, but it would also be useful to know that –

  • His cap and back cloth are embroidered in 2 ply crewel wool, and the blue trim and tassels are embroidery cotton
  • His tail is embroidery cotton too.

If you would like an elephant like Sock you might find this pattern useful.

Will Cigarette Card - elephant pattern

This is reproduction – from a greetings card.
The original cigarette card was from a set called –
Household Hints (2nd series)

I am not very fond of sewing, but I enjoyed making Sock.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Next Week…

Making a Pop-up book.

There is still a short time before the poll closes, but it looks as though “Christmas Eve” is going to be a clear winner.

Many thanks to everyone who took the time to vote.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: