Feeds:
Posts
Comments

You may have noticed that, although I do mention other websites and blogs from time to time, I don’t have a side-bar list of links on display.

This isn’t because I don’t appreciate the work of other bloggers, but because I know that I don’t have the time to maintain an up-to-date list.

WordPress statistics tell me that the following websites and bloggers have been kind enough to host a link to my blog this year and  over the past month I have checked that the links are live.

I look forward to doing more in-depth reading over the Christmas Holidays, with many thanks to all the following:

MINIATURES

Dada’s Dollhouse

Bickersgracht in miniature

Nuestras Minis – miniatures

Maria Inez Garibaldi

Kunnen nukkekoti

Minitarinat

Miniature Dreamworld – miniatures

Mini Foreningen

Le Petit monde Merveilleux de Marie

Villa Rendezvous ja muita tarinoita – miniatures

Wasting Gold Paper

Anajah’s Favoriten – a collection of dolls’ house projects to do

Dolls’ House Past and Present – miniatures and quarterly on-line magazine

So Mini Projects

One Tiny Little Thing

And then there are:

PRINTABLES

Jennifer’s Printables – printable things for miniature homes

Amy’s Wandering – printable nativity scenes, other printables and home schooling

PAPERCRAFT

Papermau – papercraft, models to make

Tektonen – papercraft, models to make

PaperCraftSquare – papercraft, models to make

AND

The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures

Minitreasures – a Wiki for miniatures

Freubelweb – crafts, paper projects

* * *

Finally, a special mention for littleglitterhouses.com, which has downloadable plans for many small building projects, some of which can be adapted for miniature use.

open-house-miniatures-christmas-2015-glitter-houses-and-bird-tree

I was looking for information on nativity sets when I came across the website and was amused at the way little snow scene houses (aka “putz”, or “glitter houses”) have travelled around the world and the ways in which they have changed in design as they did so.

For the record, these little houses  existed in the UK too. I can remember, when I was very young, helping to make a small village (there was even a postbox!) from cereal box card and gummed coloured paper. The glitter that we used came in a box and the flakes were large, flat and translucent – fascinatingly and memorably different to the silver glitter that came in a glass tube.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ettore Sobrero

ettore_sobrero_1991-catalogue

Ettore Sobrero’s books are, some of the most beautifully bound miniature volumes that I have ever seen and I was very glad to discover that I still had one of his catalogues.

I scanned the catalogue to see if I would be able to reproduce the fine quality print here. The answer to that is: no.

However, I thought that the  scans weren’t completely unflattering and decided to see if I could remember how to make a slideshow and upload it to Slideshare.

This was only partially successful because I had to compress the images in the presentation in order to be able to upload the file. This naturally affected the quality of the image on-screen and the scans became decidedly uncomplimentary.

Below is the result of my Plan B, which was to host the images on another site. I hope that this will prove to be a reliable way of storing images, although, in this instance, I still had to reduce the files a little in size.

Another reason for writing this particular blog post was to experiment with some of the changes in file management that have taken place on WordPress.

My apologies to all who find my experiments in the technological field duller than ditch water.

 

 

 

 

Fun but Messy

open-house-miniatures-glitter-christmas-trees

These date from a time when I was trying to fit many Christmas decorations into a very small space.

open-house-miniatures-slot-together-christmas-tree

  • Glue two sheets of thin card (140gsm each) together
  • Glue the paper pattern (photocopy paper, probably 80gsm) to the card
  • Place under a flat,heavy weight and allow to dry completely before cutting out
  • Cut out slot first
  • Then cut out tree (cut away from the inner corners towards the outer edge)
  • The raised surface at the cut edge may be removed by burnishing with the back of a metal tea spoon
  • Test fit and make adjustments

Decorating is a matter of choice. I did all of the following:

  • Paint
  • Allow to dry completely
  • Glitter (this is the fun but messy bit)
  • Allow to dry completely

I ran out of time, daylight and ideas when it came to photographing the finished trees, which is a pity because I like them and think that they cast pretty shadows.

 

open-house-miniatures-leave-the-fancy-photography-to-the-experts

open-house-miniatures-christmas-tree-pattern

I don’t know what size the above pattern will be when viewed / printed on another computer / printer, but the trees in the pdf below should print at 1 inch (2.5 cm) tall, which is the size of the examples I made.

OHM_011215_1_inch_Christmas_tree

 

Christmas Angels

12th scale dollhouse miniature christmas angels on a stand

These angels weren’t designed as a set.

I was trying to find a way to show that they were all slightly different.

It is a pity that the photograph (above) could be misleading because I like it much more than my usual effort (below).

12th scale swedish style dolls' house angel candlesticks

The angels were inspired by traditional Swedish Christmas ornaments. The design is mine and they are not a copy of an existing decoration. Each one is cut out, assembled and painted individually.

The angels holding a star are (from the bottom of the base to the top of the star) about 1 inch in height (2.5 cm)

The angels holding a candle are (from the bottom of the base to the top of the candle) about 1 and 1/4 inches in height  (3.2 cm)

Christmas 2015

open_house_miniatures_ christmas_2015_dolls'_house_nativity_set_umpainted

This week I borrowed a Daylight Company D45000 4 Watt Foldi LED Portable Lamp and I have to say that it has exceeded my expectations.

It is compact, solidly weighted and stable. It give a very clear light – don’t look into it, you will hurt your eyes. It makes painting by artificial light possible (not good, but possible) and in the photographs that I have just taken the colours that I see on screen are very close to the colours that I see in real life.

The lamp is available from Amazon (UK) and when I looked it was on special offer, which makes it very, very tempting as far as I am concerned, although I need to see if it can help out with photos taken in daylight before making a final decision.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The nativity scene in the photos is probably going to be my 2015 set. I am saying probably because the figures illustrated are fixed to the stand and I would prefer them to be free standing. They are glued down because they are very small and light, especially the baby Jesus who goes missing despite all my efforts I make to keep him safe.

MATERIALS:

Varnished wooden base (gloss varnish)

Hand-painted resin / plastic figures and star. These are finished with a very tiny amount of gold, sealed and given several thin coats of matt / satin varnish so that they have a slight sheen, but are not too shiny.

SIZE:

The stand is -1″ wide (approx 2.5cm) x  just over 1″ tall (approx 2.75cm)

The tallest figure (Joseph) is 2cm – roughly 3/4 of an inch

As the stands are handmade and the figures are hand-painted, they are all slightly different.

UPDATE: 24th November 2015

open_house_miniatures_ christmas_2015_dolls'_house_nativity_set_daylight

As far as I am concerned, daylight is still best.

The Not Very Encouraging News

  1. My camera is not working reliably
  2. My little home printer is not working at all

Result: no paper projects to do on this blog until above are fixed or replaced

The Good News

  1. The scanner part of my printer is working. (I am not saying that it does a wonderful job, but at least it is working)

The “Oh no, what now…” News

Due to building work at home, alot of my things have been in store.

While in store, some things evidently became damp (see foxing on scan of card below)

example of foxing due to damp

Foxing (the brown spots) is the result of a type of mould and I have to go through everything and check / air / scan / throw away / make tough decisions about it.

While doing this, I thought that I should make the effort to digitize my paper-based archive. [Archive, in this case = a very grand word for a box of postcards, scraps and other miscellaneous junk.]

However, I have so much to do (in general) at the moment that I cannot – must not – spend more than 1 hour a day sitting in front of my computer.

Despite this, in an unwise(?) but praiseworthy(?) attempt to share what I thought might be useful to other people interested in making miniature things, I created a page called Printables on this blog.

I then came swiftly to the conclusion that:

  1. My idea of what is “useful” may not be universally “useful”
  2. I will soon run out of storage space, if I add full size images randomly
  3. Looking through lots of thumbnail sized images on a computer screen is tedious

Result: a suggestion that is going to end in disappointment for some people.

The suggestion is this:

There should be a comments box on this page and, if you would like to, you can leave a message there letting me know what would be useful to you. Please be as specific as you can, for example magazines is good, but magazines (fashion, 1950s) would be even better.

This would be a great help to me, as I could spend more time scanning and less time uploading (not at all useful) images here.

A couple of things to bear in mind, please:

  1. My 1 Hour a Day Computer Rule
  2. There are only 24 hours in a day and I do my best to be asleep for at least 6 of them

Finally:

Below is the result of one hour’s work. Most of the time was taken up by typing the descriptions and double checking that the right description was with the right card and how they were displayed on screen etc., etc., etc. This means that any scans I upload here are not going to have detailed written descriptions.

And I can’t decide if the following should be called: “cigarette cards“, “lithographic prints” or “possible miniature theatre scenery“, so please don’t be surprised if images are not classified as you think they should be.

No. 2 of 25 Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings -

No. 2 of 25 Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“Dutch Boats off Flushing”
De Reszke Cigarettes – J Millhoff & Co Ltd.

Cigarette Cards No. 20 (of 80) in the series Evolution of the British Navy - no manufacturer name given.

No. 20 (of 80) in the series Evolution of the British Navy
– no manufacturer name given.

Cigarette card - No. 19 (of 25)

No. 19 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“Dutch Boats in a Calm”
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

Cigarette Card - No. 3 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 3 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
Dedham Mill
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

Cigarette Card - No. 12 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 12 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
“The Valley of the Llugwy”
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

No. 7 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings

No. 7 (of 25) Reproductions of Celebrated Oil Paintings
The Stream
Army Club Cigarettes – Cavanders Ltd

 

* * *

Afterword

I don’t sponsor any advertisements on this blog

WordPress need to make money in order to run their blogging service and so they sell advertising space.

I could, by paying WordPress a small fee, make this blog advert free – nice as this would be, it’s not going to happen soon.

paper model kiosk - paper nativity download - free

This is going to sound rushed, because I am supposed to be doing something else this morning, but I saw this and I thought it was too good to miss.

crechemania - paper model kiosk - excellent quality - free nativity download

Paper Model Kiosk (aka Crechemania) have a very large collection of downloadable paper nativities on their entrancing, enthralling, amazing website. Some of them, like the miniature example above are free. (Miniature in this case = 3 x 1.5 x 3.5 inches)

The downloads page for all their nativity sets is here.

To use the site and receive a download, you need to register your email address.

When you ask for a free (I MUST NOT, (cannot) buy them all, although I want to) download, a link that is live for one hour is sent to your email address. By clicking on the link in the email, you are re-directed to the Crechemania website and can then download a pdf of your selected nativity.

I have just tried this out and encountered one minor problem – the registration part of Paper Model Kiosk’s site did not work smoothly for me in Firefox. It was, however, fine in Google.

I am going to repeat the Crechemania Free Download Service agreement here :-

By using this Crechemania Free Download Service I agree with the Crechemania.com download policy; that these downloads are copyrighted material; that they are for my personal use only. I may download as many items as I wish; as many times as I wish; print as many as I wish; assemble as many as I wish; give away as many as I wish. But I may not sell them; offer them for sale on Internet sites; post these as Downloads on my Web site; or mailing lists; and I agree to the receipt of Crèchemania.com email notices and newsletters about crèche downloads, news, and information; and I understand that I may receive periodic emails notifying me of Chrèchemania news and updates.

Afterword

Any advertisements that you see on this on this blog page, are not mine.

WordPress has to fund this “free” weblog service somehow and so they sell advertising space to third parties

I could, by paying WordPress a small amount of money, stop the adverts appearing here.

I haven’t done this – and considering that I could buy a couple of nativities for the same money, can you blame me?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 273 other followers